Making Feta at Home

Author: Valerie Pearson   Date Posted:7 July 2010 

With just four liters of milk you can make your own Feta cheese. This recipe is a Danish type Feta, which has a soft and creamy texture, rather than the traditional Greek Feta, with its more crumbly texture.This can be made out of regular, homogenized, fu
With just four liters of milk you can make your own Feta cheese. This recipe is a Danish type Feta, which has a soft and creamy texture, rather than the traditional Greek Feta, with its more crumbly texture. This can be made out of regular, homogenized, full cream milk from your local grocery store, so you do not have to live in the country and have a cow to have home made, delicious, fresh cheese at a fraction of the cost you would pay at the grocery store. All cheese making is essentially the making of curds and whey. In some soft cheeses the whole of the milk becomes your cheese. In other cheeses, such as Feta, the curds clearly separate from the whey, as you can see in these photos. These curds can then be transferred into a cheese-making cloth, lined colander and then hung to drain. Alternatively, the curds can be transferred into cheese-making cloth lined Feta baskets and pressed to expel the additional whey. Which ever method you choose, you will get a soft textured, Danish style Feta, that can be cut into one centimetre cubes and sprinkled with salt to taste. For the best flavour, it should be aged for about three days before eating, if you can wait that long, and will last in the fridge for up to a week. It never lasts that long at my house, as I have some big, two-legged mice that are always stealing the cheese. Well, I am off to go and open a bottle of wine to have with my cheese. Enjoy!